About

Our Approach

Our approach is to work slowly and steadily and make everything from scratch. We like to consider ourselves an incubator for gastronomic ideas. It is in this spirit that we will always strive to explore and experiment with new recipes and new products.

Our intention is to preserve gastronomic tradition and to help integrate it into the time in which we live. Our emphasis is on technique and ingredients. Our products are simple and made with the cleanest, best ingredients we can find, with technique that has survived and evolved through generations.

All of our products are made by hand, slowly, in small batches. You will find a hand-written batch number on every item.

Our Story | About Charlito’s Cocina

Founded in 2011, C.C.’s aims is to explore and utilize the rich gastronomic traditions used to preserve food prior to the days of refrigeration and freezers. It is in the spirit of this robust tradition that we strive to create delicious, shelf stable foods using the cleanest, most well raised ingredients possible.

Because the curing of meat plays such a prominent role in the tradition of food preservation, it is one of our primary focuses. We derive our influence in this category primarily from the curing traditions of Spain, while striving, one product at a time, to distinguish a style that is uniquely our own. All the meat we use is 100% pasture raised, heritage breed pork. The salt we use is all hand harvested fleur de sel.

About “Charlito,” by Charles

After gaining a wealth of knowledge working under two mentor-chefs who produced much of their own charcuterie, I attended the French Culinary Institute in New York City, where I was fortunate to work closely with a master charcutier. After finishing at FCI, I traveled to Spain to study the Spanish tradition of curing meats and preserving food with family in Salamanca and Extremadura who had been curing meats and olives, and making wine, among other things, in their home for generations.

Born Charles Samuel Wekselbaum, and Raised in New York City in a Cuban-American household, I took on the nickname, “Charlito,” derived partially from a difficulty that Spanish speakers close to me seemed to  have pronouncing “Charles,” and partially of a willingness to bestow an affectionate nickname upon “little Charles.” The nickname stuck. It is rife with love, affection, and now, history. The name “Charlito’s Cocina” seemed a most fitting way to give proud and accurate identity to this gastronomic adventure.